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St. Michael Catholic Secondary School
"QUIS UT DEUS"
905.951.8935
  • St. Michael Catholic Secondary School
  • 9130 Columbia Way
  • Bolton ON , L7E4G6
  • Principal: Ferdinando Tantalo
  • Vice Principal(s): Debbie Duke-Kelly
    Robert Weatherbee


  • Superintendents: Jodi Kuran
  • Trustee: Frank Di Cosola (Caledon Ward 4, 2 & 5)
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Social Science and Canadian/World Studies

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“If something is true, it is good and beautiful; if it is beautiful; it is good and true; if it is good, it is true and it is beautiful. And together, these elements enable us to grow and help us to love life, even when we are not well, even in the midst of many problems. True education enables us to love life and opens us to the fullness of life.” -Pope Francis

 

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Social Science Mission Statement:

The primary goal in Social Science is to promote the importance of social change, environmental awareness, historical significance and what it means to be a discerning catholic learner and member in society.  These ideas model the process where values, attitudes, and thoughts of social institutions evolve and modify as time progresses.  The Social Science Department strives to bring awareness to the importance of building a foundation for our students that advocates for 21st century societal ideologies, such as technology, preservation of our environment, equity, inclusivity and the impact of historical events.     

 

 

 

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Canadian and World Studies Courses:

 

Grade 9: Canadian Geography Academic

This course examines interrelationships within and between Canada’s natural and human systems and how these systems interconnect with those in other parts of the world. Students will explore environmental, economic, and social geographic issues relating to topics such as transportation options, energy choices, and urban development. Students will apply the concepts of geographic thinking and the geographic inquiry process, including spatial technologies, to investigate various geographic issues and to develop possible approaches for making Canada a more sustainable place in which to live.

Prerequisite: None

 

Grade 9: Canadian Geography Applied

This course focuses on current geographic issues that affect Canadians. Students will draw on their personal and everyday experiences as they explore issues relating to food and water supplies, competing land uses, interactions with the natural environment, and other topics relevant to sustainable living in Canada. They will also develop an awareness that issues that affect their lives in Canada are interconnected with issues in other parts of the world. Throughout the course, students will use the concepts of geographic thinking, the geographic inquiry process, and spatial technologies to guide and support their investigations.

Prerequisite: None

 

Grade 10: Canadian History Academic

This course explores social, economic, and political developments and events and their impact on the lives of different individuals, groups, and communities, including First Nations, Métis, and Inuit individuals and communities, in Canada since 1914. Students will examine the role of conflict and cooperation in Canadian society, Canada’s evolving role within the global community, and the impact of various individuals, organizations, and events on identities, citizenship, and heritage in Canada. Students will develop an understanding of some of the political developments and government policies that have had a lasting impact on First Nations, Métis, and Inuit individuals and communities. They will develop their ability to apply the concepts of historical thinking and the historical inquiry process, including the interpretation and analysis of evidence, when investigating key issues and events in Canadian history since 1914.

Prerequisite: None

 

Grade 10: Canadian History Applied

This course focuses on the social context of historical developments and events and how they have affected the lives of people in Canada, including First Nations, Métis, and Inuit individuals and communities, since 1914. Students will explore interactions between various communities in Canada as well as contributions of individuals and groups to heritage and identities in Canada. Students will develop an understanding of some key political developments and government policies that have had an impact on First Nations, Métis, and Inuit individuals and communities. They will develop their ability to apply the concepts of historical thinking and the historical inquiry process, including the interpretation and analysis of evidence, when investigating the continuing relevance of historical developments and how they have helped shape communities in present-day Canada. CHC2P

Prerequisite: None

 

Grade 10: Canadian Civics Open

This course explores rights and responsibilities associated with being an active citizen in a democratic society. Students will explore issues of civic importance such as healthy schools, community planning, environmental responsibility, and the influence of social media, while developing their understanding of the role of civic engagement and of political processes in the local, national, and/or global community. Students will apply the concepts of political thinking and the political inquiry process to investigate, and express informed opinions about, a range of political issues and developments that are both of significance in today’s world and of personal interest to them.

Prerequisite: None

 

Grade 11: Forces of Nature: Physical Processes and Disasters University/College Preparation


In this course, students will explore physical processes related to the earth’s water, land, and air. They will investigate how these processes shape the planet’s natural characteristics and affect human systems, how they are involved in the creation of natural disasters, and how they influence the impacts of human disasters. Throughout the course, students will apply the concepts of geographic thinking and the geographic inquiry process and use spatial technologies to analyse these processes, make predictions related to natural disasters, and assess ways of responding to them.

Prerequisite: Issues in Canadian Geography, Grade 9, Academic or Applied

 

Grade 11: Travel and Tourism: A Geographic Perspective Open

This course focuses on issues related to travel and tourism within and between various regions of the world. Students will investigate unique environmental, sociocultural, economic, and political characteristics of selected world regions. They will explore travel patterns and trends, as well as tensions related to tourism, and will predict future tourism destinations. Students will apply the concepts of geographic thinking and the geographic inquiry process, including spatial technologies, to investigate the impact of the travel industry on natural environments and human communities.

Prerequisite: Issues in Canadian Geography, Grade 9, Academic or Applied

 

Grade 11: World History to the End of the Fifteenth Century University/College

This course explores the history of various societies and civilizations around the world, from earliest times to around 1500 CE. Students will investigate a range of factors that contributed to the rise, success, and decline of various ancient and pre-modern societies throughout the world and will examine life in and the cultural and political legacy of these societies. Students will extend their ability to apply the concepts of historical thinking and the historical inquiry process, including the interpretation and analysis of evidence, when investigating social, political, and economic structures and historical forces at work in various societies and in different historical eras.

Prerequisite: Canadian History since World War I, Grade 10, Academic or Applied

 

Grade 11: American History University

This course explores key aspects of the social, economic, and political development of the United States from precontact to the present. Students will examine the contributions of groups and individuals to the country’s evolution and will explore the historical context of key issues, trends, and events that have had an impact on the United States, its identity and culture, and its role in the global community. Students will extend their ability to apply the concepts of historical thinking and the historical inquiry process, including the interpretation and analysis of evidence, when investigating various forces that helped shape American history.

Prerequisite: Canadian History since World War I, Grade 10, Academic or Applied

 

 Grade 11: Understanding Canadian Law University/College Preparation

This course explores Canadian law, with a focus on legal issues that are relevant to the lives of people in Canada. Students will gain an understanding of laws relating to rights and freedoms in Canada; our legal system; and family, contract, employment, tort, and criminal law. Students will develop legal reasoning skills and will apply the concepts of legal thinking and the legal studies inquiry process when investigating a range of legal issues and formulating and communicating informed opinions about them.

Prerequisite: Canadian History since World War I, Grade 10, Academic or Applied

 

Grade 12: World Issues: A Geographic Analysis University

In this course, students will address the challenge of creating a more sustainable and equitable world. They will explore issues involving a wide range of topics, including economic disparities, threats to the environment, globalization, human rights, and quality of life, and will analyse government policies, international agreements, and individual responsibilities relating to them. Students will apply the concepts of geographic thinking and the geographic inquiry process, including the use of spatial technologies, to investigate these complex issues and their impacts on natural and human communities around the world.

Prerequisite: Any university or university/college preparation course in Canadian and world studies, English, or social sciences and humanities

 

Grade 12: World History since the Fifteenth Century University

This course traces major developments and events in world history since approximately 1450. Students will explore social, economic, and political changes, the historical roots of contemporary issues, and the role of conflict and cooperation in global interrelationships. They will extend their ability to apply the concepts of historical thinking and the historical inquiry process, including the interpretation and analysis of evidence, as they investigate key issues and ideas and assess societal progress or decline in world history.

Prerequisite: Any university or university/college preparation course in Canadian and world studies, English, or social sciences and humanities

 

Grade 12: Canadian and International Law University

This course explores a range of contemporary legal issues and how they are addressed in both Canadian and international law. Students will develop an understanding of the principles of Canadian and international law and of issues related to human rights and freedoms, conflict resolution, and criminal, environmental, and workplace law, both in Canada and internationally. Students will apply the concepts of legal thinking and the legal studies inquiry process, and will develop legal reasoning skills, when investigating these and other issues in both Canadian and international contexts.

Prerequisite: Any university or university/college preparation course in Canadian and world studies, English, or social sciences and humanities.

 

 Grade 12: Adventures in World History Workplace Preparation

This course examines significant developments and events in world history from earliest times to the present. Students will explore a variety of social, cultural, economic, and political developments in different regions of the world and during different periods. In addition to investigating how conflict, religion, work, and technology have helped shape people’s lives, students will examine the contributions of some significant individuals to our global heritage. Students will apply the concepts of historical thinking and the historical inquiry process, including the interpretation and analysis of evidence, when investigating a variety of human experiences in world history.

Prerequisite: Canadian History since World War I, Grade 10, Academic or Applied, or the locally developed compulsory course (LDCC) in Canadian history

 

 

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Social Science and Humanities Courses:

Grade 9 or 10: Food and Nutrition Open

This course focuses on guidelines for making nutritious food choices. Students will investigate factors that influence food choices, including beliefs, attitudes, current trends, traditional eating patterns, food-marketing strategies, and individual needs. Students will also explore the environmental impact of a variety of food choices at the local and global level. The course provides students with opportunities to develop food-preparation skills and introduces them to the use of social science research methods in the area of food and nutrition.

Prerequisite: None

 

 Grade 11: Food and Culture University/College Preparation

This course focuses on the flavours, aromas, cooking techniques, foods, and cultural traditions of world cuisines. Students will explore the origins of and developments in diverse food traditions. They will demonstrate the ability to cook with ingredients and equipment from a variety of cultures, compare food-related etiquette in many countries and cultures, and explain how Canadian food choices and traditions have been influenced by other cultures. Students will develop practical skills and apply social science research methods while investigating foods and food practices from around the world.

Prerequisite: None

 

Grade 11: Food and Culture Workplace

This course focuses on the flavours, aromas, cooking techniques, foods, and cultural traditions of world cuisines. Students will demonstrate the ability to cook with ingredients and equipment from a range of cultures, describe food-related etiquette in a variety of countries and cultures, and explore ways in which Canadian food choices and traditions have been influenced by other cultures. Students will have opportunities to develop practical skills and apply research skills as they investigate foods and food practices from around the world.

Prerequisite: None

 

Grade 11: Introduction to Anthropology, Psychology and Sociology University

This course provides students with opportunities to think critically about theories, questions, and issues related to anthropology, psychology, and sociology. Students will develop an understanding of the approaches and research methods used by social scientists. They will be given opportunities to explore theories from a variety of perspectives, to conduct social science research, and to become familiar with current thinking on a range of issues within the three disciplines.

Prerequisite: The Grade 10 academic course in English, or the Grade 10 academic history course (Canadian and world studies)

 

Grade 11: Introduction to Anthropology, Psychology and Sociology College

This course introduces students to theories, questions, and issues related to anthropology, psychology, and sociology. Students learn about approaches and research methods used by social scientists. Students will be given opportunities to apply theories from a variety of perspectives, to conduct social science research, and to become familiar with current issues within the three disciplines.

Prerequisite: None

 

Grade 11: Raising Healthy Children Open

This course focuses on the skills and knowledge parents, guardians, and caregivers need, with particular emphasis on maternal health, pregnancy, birth, and the early years of human development (birth to six years old). Through study and practical experience, students will learn how to meet the developmental needs of young children, communicate with them, and effectively guide their early behaviour. Students will develop their research skills through investigations related to caregiving and child rearing.
Prerequisite: None

 

Grade 12: Nutrition and Health University

This course examines the relationships between food, energy balance, and nutritional status; the nutritional needs of individuals at different stages of life; and the role of nutrition in health and disease. Students will evaluate nutrition-related trends and will determine how food choices can promote food security and environmental responsibility. Students will learn about healthy eating, expand their repertoire of food-preparation techniques, and develop their social science research skills by investigating issues related to nutrition and health.

Prerequisite: Any university or university/college preparation course in social sciences and humanities, English, or Canadian and world studies

 

Grade 12: Nutrition and Health College

This course focuses on the relationship between nutrition and health at different stages of life and on global issues related to food production. Students will investigate the role of nutrition in health and disease and assess strategies for promoting food security and environmental responsibility. Students will learn about healthy eating, expand their repertoire of food-preparation techniques, and refine their ability to use social science research and inquiry methods to investigate topics related to nutrition and health.

Prerequisite: Any university, college, or university/college preparation course in social sciences and humanities, English, or Canadian and world studies.

 

Grade 12: Challenge and Change in Canadian Society University

This course focuses on the use of social science theories, perspectives, and methodologies to investigate and explain shifts in knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and behaviour and their impact on society. Students will critically analyse how and why cultural, social, and behavioural patterns change over time. They will explore the ideas of social theorists and use those ideas to analyse causes of and responses to challenges such as technological change, deviance, and global inequalities. Students will explore ways in which social science research methods can be used to study social change.

Prerequisite: Any university or university/college preparation course in social sciences and humanities, English, or Canadian and world studies


Grade 12: Families in Canada University

This course enables students to draw on sociological, psychological, and anthropological theories and research to analyse the development of individuals, intimate relationships, and family and parent-child relationships. Students will focus on issues and challenges facing individuals and families in Canada’s diverse society. They will develop analytical tools that enable them to assess various factors affecting families and to consider policies and practices intended to support families in Canada. They will develop the investigative skills required to conduct and communicate the results of research on individuals, intimate relationships, and parent-child relationships.

Prerequisite: Any university or university/college preparation course in social sciences and humanities, English, or Canadian and world studies

 

 Experiential Learning

 

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